The Education Evolving Blog

February 11, 2013

Amidst a chorus of governors ramping up efforts to fix K-12 by controlling teachers, California Governor Jerry Brown sang a different song in his January State of the State Address:

The laws that are in fashion demand tightly constrained curricula and reams of accountability data. All the better if it requires quiz-bits of information, regurgitated at regular intervals and stored in vast computers. Performance metrics, of course, are invoked like talismans. Distant authorities crack the whip, demanding quantitative measures and a stark, single number to...

February 7, 2013

This post was originally blogged on the Education Week Of, By, For blog.

In the introductory chapter of A Year at Mission Hill, the teachers unassumingly drop a bombshell. They attribute their school's sustained success to a democratic governance structure in which teachers have "freedom and autonomy." Not just classroom autonomy, but the authority to collectively make decisions that influence whole school...

January 17, 2013

I’m excited and honored to have been guest blogger at Eduwonk yesterday. I hope you’ll visit Andrew Rotherham’s blog and give it a read. As always with our work at Education Evolving, we welcome your feedback.

The guest blog concludes, "Teachers could be the social entrepreneurs we need for K-12. So why not open the opportunity for interested...

January 16, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

We increasingly believe there need to be entities within the K12 system charged with promoting innovation, and encouraging applications to start new, quality schools. Charter school authorizers may be good candidates for this role.

One example of this is Innovative Quality Schools (IQS), a single-purpose charter school authorizer in Minnesota. IQS has issued a...

January 7, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

Our own Ted Kolderie has written a blog entry that was featured last Friday on Tom Vander Ark’s Getting Smart blog. Kolderie’s post discusses our split screen strategy, which supports developing new and different models of school while also doing everything possible to improve existing district schools.

Kolderie’s most recent paper, Where National Education Policy Goes Next – To Succeed, explains why the current strategy for K-12 education...

December 31, 2012 · By Dan Loritz

We at Education Evolving try to spend most of our time looking forward. But as this year comes to an end, we want to take a moment to look back on our work in 2012. Below are a few highlights.

Legislation on individualized learning

Earlier this year, the Minnesota legislature passed Education Evolving’s legislation to permit districts to give their schools the authority to individualize learning. On May 1 Governor Mark Dayton signed the education omnibus bill, a provision of which allows...

December 28, 2012 · By Lars Esdal

Education Evolving senior associate Curt Johnson will be among several panelists featured in an important, televised conversation about redesigning education in Minnesota.

The Twin Cities Public Television (TPT) program, Redesigning MN: A Lesson in Change is an eight part series that explores the dramatic impact the looming retirement of more than a million baby boomers will have on Minnesota. Tonight’s 56-minute show will begin at 7pm, and will be focused on education. Curt and other panelists will discuss ways to innovate and improve K-12...

December 12, 2012 · By Ted Kolderie

We sense a growing, spreading, desire to re-think the strategy for education -- both the 'what' of school and the 'how' of change.

We've just released a new paper, which proposes a new and different 'theory of action'.

We do need very different schools, and approaches to learning. But, being practical, we can't vote-in radical change. Rather, we need to arrange for K-12 to change the way successful systems change. Through innovation.

I hope you...

December 9, 2012 · By Ted Kolderie

Through the good efforts of Tim McDonald, an E|E associate now studying at the Kennedy School of Government, I spent November 28-30 in some unexpectedly useful conversations at Harvard.

Tim had arranged sessions about 'public services redesign' with students at the Harvard Kennedy School, at the Graduate School of Education, and with David Ellwood, the dean of the Kennedy School (with whose father, Paul, I'd worked on health-policy questions in Minnesota years back).

Bob Schwartz, now again in the faculty of...

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