The Education Evolving Blog

March 14, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

On Monday, a commission of leading education scholars unveiled a series of reports, which call for a rethinking of the role of assessments in learning. The reports assert that the primary purpose for assessment should be instructional feedback, serving as a tool to improve student learning.

The commission expressed concern over the current usage of assessment as primarily a punitive tool of accountability. One report author asked, in his opening remarks, whether using assessments to score and rank students may be morally questionable, if students of...

March 1, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

UPDATE 3/14/2013: You can now view an archive of the webinar.

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Next week the National Education Association (NEA) Center for Great Public Schools is hosting a Webinar to explore the topic of teacher professionalism. All are invited to come learn and dialogue, NEA member or not. Please mark your calendars and join us!

Great Teachers Ensuring Great Teaching:
Teacher Leadership and Teacher-Led Schools

Wednesday, March 6, 2013
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (...

February 26, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

Tom Vander Ark’s recent post in his Education Week blog on innovation is all about the shifting landscape of education in Minnesota. In his blog entry, Vander Ark surveys the advocacy and policy groups working in the state, and even pokes fun at the frigid Minnesota weather (easy for him to say from Phoenix!). Below are his remarks on Education Evolving.

The most interesting national voice is the...

February 21, 2013 · By Ted Kolderie

I made a few possibly provocative observations and suggestions about the 'How' of innovation when talking in Nashville February 6 to the heads of the state charter-school associations and support organizations.

Listen to a short excerpt (about 5 minutes):
Click here to play

In brief, what I said was:

  1. Today...
February 11, 2013

Amidst a chorus of governors ramping up efforts to fix K-12 by controlling teachers, California Governor Jerry Brown sang a different song in his January State of the State Address:

The laws that are in fashion demand tightly constrained curricula and reams of accountability data. All the better if it requires quiz-bits of information, regurgitated at regular intervals and stored in vast computers. Performance metrics, of course, are invoked like talismans. Distant authorities crack the whip, demanding quantitative measures and a stark, single number to...

February 7, 2013

This post was originally blogged on the Education Week Of, By, For blog.

In the introductory chapter of A Year at Mission Hill, the teachers unassumingly drop a bombshell. They attribute their school's sustained success to a democratic governance structure in which teachers have "freedom and autonomy." Not just classroom autonomy, but the authority to collectively make decisions that influence whole school...

January 17, 2013

I’m excited and honored to have been guest blogger at Eduwonk yesterday. I hope you’ll visit Andrew Rotherham’s blog and give it a read. As always with our work at Education Evolving, we welcome your feedback.

The guest blog concludes, "Teachers could be the social entrepreneurs we need for K-12. So why not open the opportunity for interested...

January 16, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

We increasingly believe there need to be entities within the K12 system charged with promoting innovation, and encouraging applications to start new, quality schools. Charter school authorizers may be good candidates for this role.

One example of this is Innovative Quality Schools (IQS), a single-purpose charter school authorizer in Minnesota. IQS has issued a...

January 7, 2013 · By Lars Esdal

Our own Ted Kolderie has written a blog entry that was featured last Friday on Tom Vander Ark’s Getting Smart blog. Kolderie’s post discusses our split screen strategy, which supports developing new and different models of school while also doing everything possible to improve existing district schools.

Kolderie’s most recent paper, Where National Education Policy Goes Next – To Succeed, explains why the current strategy for K-12 education...

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