Publications

Article · February 2017

Ted Kolderie is one of two recipients this year of the Minnesota Association of Alternative Programs (MAAP) prestigious "Exemplary Award". Ted received the award at the 34th Annual MAAP Conference last week at the Verizon Center in Mankato.

Web Resource · February 2017

Join us Tuesday, Feb. 7th with Silicon Valley-based Summit Learning as they describe their free program to help schools implement personalized learning, and the software they are developing in collaboration with engineers at Facebook that tracks students’ personalized learning plans. Hear from educators participating in a pilot, and about how you can participate.

Web Resource · September 2016

A new section of our website with resources on Minnesota state policies that can help enable school districts to innovate with learning. Includes info on site-governed schools, the new teacher-governed grants program, and more.

Article · September 2016

Where exactly does chartering fit, in the strategy for public education? Across America that question is rising, as in a number of big cities the charter sector gets larger and as the local districts are losing enrollment. In this commentary in the StarTribune, Ted Kolderie looks at four current answers to the question—and suggests a fifth, more practical answer.

Memo · May 2016

Having good definitions of the terms "student achievement" and "school quality" is important in our nation's quest to improve public education. But the two terms are often defined too simply, too narrowly, too controversially. This working memo puts forth our own deeper and broader definitions of these two important terms.

Meeting Notes · April 2016

In October of 2015, Education Evolving (EE) produced a three-session series in partnership with the Achievement Gap Committee, each session examining a different dimension of the challenge to close the gap in achievement across different categories of students. This report is a selective summary of the main points and questions highlighted in this series.

Article · April 2016

"Innovation Zones" will change the way we teach, test and measure learning. A Commentary for the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Memo · March 2016

Public education now has two sectors: a district sector and a chartered sector. Chartering—and this two-sector arrangement in general—needs to be thought of as a strategy for change, not just a set of schools. Given flexibility, the chartered sector can and does generate the needed innovation, the necessary improvements in learning.

Article · December 2015

The face of Minnesota is changing, and so must our integration policy. A Commentary for the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Speech · November 2015

The Minnesota Association of Alternative Programs invited Ted Kolderie to discuss how innovation is key to systemic change in public education and how schools must resist 'the pressure for sameness'. Kolderie called upon the 'alternative' sector to share its accomplishments in innovation—thus validating the sector and making clear that what is happening there is essential for change and improvement in the mainline district sector. This is his speech.

Report · October 2015

Teaching is the number one in-school factor affecting student outcomes. And a central part of the strategy for improving teaching involves better teacher preparation. With this report, we present our own contribution to that effort: we highlight essential elements and best practices for a new, different, and we believe better, teacher preparation program.

Book · September 2015

For three decades now, the course of action has been to accept the system as it stands and to push its schools and teachers to deliver ‘better performance’. Perhaps not surprisingly, that effort to get an inert system to do-better has not proved an outstanding success. The theory of action should instead be to turn public education into a self-improving system.

Report · August 2015

Much of the discussion about 'what's working' suggests that students learn because the school is district, charter, parochial or whatever. This is bizarre. Clearly, students learn from what goes on in the school; from its curriculum, pedagogy, materials and teachers. This report begins to sketch a taxonomy that gets at these more meaningful school properties.

Memo · July 2015

A description of areas of autonomy, assembled while consulting literature and visiting schools during the writing of the book Trusting Teachers with School Success. And, examples of how schools have used those autonomies.

Article · April 2015

A big district like Minneapolis has dozens of schools, and all of them could be innovating. That is, in fact, the strategic plan. But the big brain — the central office — gets in the way. How might the state usefully intervene? A Sunday Commentary for the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Memo · January 2015

In November, 2014 the U.S. Department of Education proposed a set of priorities, requirements, and criteria for the federal charter grants to state education agencies. Here is the response of three senior E|E associates, to that proposal.

Web Resource · January 2015

All known teacher-powered (i.e. teacher-led) schools, both in list form and plotted as pins on a map. A resource of the Teacher-Powered Schools Initiative.

Web Resource · January 2015

A detailed step-by-step guide for teachers interested in creating a new teacher-powered school or converting their current school.

Article · September 2014

A back page Education Week commentary from September 2014 in which Ted Kolderie asks: why don't we get education changing the way successful systems change?

Article · August 2014

To get innovation in K-12 we need to free those closest to the action—the teachers—to innovate and meet the needs of their students. Ted Kolderie draws lessons from World War 2 to make this argument, in a commentary in the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

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