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teacher leadership

How a School Looks When Managed by a Teacher Partnership

There's growing interest in improving the "management of human capital" in K-12: teacher recruitment, retention, compensation, accountability, etc. Usually this suggests 'better administration.' Yet, these decisions might be better made by teachers running a professional partnership. This interview with teacher Carrie Bakken addresses how a partnership handles running a public school.

Professionals and Administrators: Two Models of Organization

Notes from an evening with a group of teachers, and the partners in a law firm and a medical clinic. The discussion about the relationship of professionals and administrators, in law and medicine, compared to the relationship of teachers and principal in a typical school, is fascinating especially with regards to authority and pay.

Can Teachers Run Their Own Schools?

A case study of Avalon School and several other teacher-led schools in the Midwest. These schools use resources differently than traditional district schools, use a different praxis of teaching, and divide authority and responsibility differently—including assigning responsibility for learning to the students.

Teacher Professional Partnerships: Books and Media Source List

This document lists several articles and book-chapters that have written up the teacher professional partnership/cooperative idea.

Wasting Minds by Ronald A. Wolk

Ron Wolk, founder of Education Week, draws on his three decades in school reform to make the case for a "new schools" strategy, focused on individualized instruction instead of an assembly line approach to learning.

Teacher Professional Partnerships: A Different Way to Help Teachers and Teaching

Teachers could and should have the option to work—as many other professionals do—with colleagues in a professional group which they collectively own, with administrators working for them. This is the original report on the topic. An inventory of schools with teacher autonomy is available here.

Worker Democracy and Worker Productivity

When "workers" are involved in making decisions about their workplaces, their productivity can increase. This article examines the empirical support for this argument over a wide range of types of organizations.