Blog posts from 2010

September 27, 2010

By: Bob Wedl, former Minnesota Commissioner of Education and currently a Partner at Education|Evolving

In recent weeks there was considerable discussion in the national education press about the reduction of students in the special education category labeled "Learning Disabled."

There is debate about why this has happened, with a number of explanations including deliberate under-identification of students to...

September 24, 2010

Editor’s note: Each Friday we feature guest bloggers that are involved in rethinking what is possible with schooling and the education system.

In this guest post Bob Bilyk, founder and former director Cyber Village Academy, a charter school in Saint Paul, envisions technology’s capacity to customize education for students. Now, the founder of LodeStar Learning, he argues most vendors’ curriculum is so expensive that teachers cannot mix and match curricula. He argues for a new type of school, and a new attitude that focuses on integrating the full...

September 22, 2010

Two years ago, E|E’s managing partner Curt Johnson co-authored a book that explains the accelerating pace of change in K-12. Now, Johnson and co-authors Clayton Christensen and Michael Horn have published a second edition ofDisrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns.”

The second edition includes a new chapter on increasing student motivation—a centerpiece of E|E strategies...

September 20, 2010

The Wisconsin Charter Schools Association recently highlighted the saving of a school in its monthly newsletter.

Milwaukee School Closing Creates new opportunities for students:

Milwaukee College Prep, the 2008 Wisconsin Charter School of the Year, has been given an incredible opportunity to positively affect the lives of more students in Milwaukee. The unfortunate closure of the Academy of Learning and Leadership in...
September 17, 2010

Editor’s note: Each Friday we feature guest bloggers that are involved in rethinking what is possible with schooling and the education system.

In a guest post for Education Innovating, Massachusetts Secretary of Education Paul Reville describes the motivation behind that state’s recently-enacted Innovation Schools law, enabling districts to create schools with autonomy reflective of chartering. This significant systemic reform is similar to Boston's Pilot Schools...

September 16, 2010

The idea of organizing a 'school' as a professional partnership has now hit the national media. The New York Times had a front-page story last week about teachers in New Jersey. The Christian Science Monitor had a piece earlier about the teacher-led school...

September 15, 2010

Robert Samuelson of the Washington Post has determined that students don’t learn from school reforms.

“Few subjects inspire more intellectual dishonesty and political puffery than “school reform,’” he wrote recently.

“The larger cause of failure is almost unmentionable: shrunken student motivation. Students, after all, have to do the work. If they aren't motivated, even capable teachers may fail.”

Motivation is weak, he argues, because...

September 13, 2010

If learning ultimately depends upon effort put forth by students, then the motivation of a student is central. The Hope Survey is a different way of looking at assessment. It measures student perceptions of autonomy, belonging, and goal orientation—seeking to diagnose whether a school culture has the components that encourage higher levels of engagement in learning.

Yet research shows engagement and motivation decreases as students progress through...

September 10, 2010

Editor’s note: Each Friday we feature guest bloggers that are involved in rethinking what is possible with schooling and the education system.

Fraser Speirs is a software developer and teaches computing at Cedars School of Excellence, an ‘independent’ (non-publicly funded) all ages school in the UK. He maintains a blog and recently wrote about bringing iPads into...

September 8, 2010

Critics have descended on the "Investing in Innovation" ("i3") program of the U.S. Department of Education. Most argue it's financing not innovation but the replication of old innovations. In a talk August 3 to the Knowledge Alliance, E|E's Ted Kolderie explained why 'continuous improvement' alone is unsound policy; why sound policy does require true innovation – followed, of course, by “improvement”.

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